G. Uehling's Beyond Memory: The Crimean Tatars' Deportation and Return PDF

By G. Uehling

ISBN-10: 1403962642

ISBN-13: 9781403962645

ISBN-10: 1403981272

ISBN-13: 9781403981271

Within the ultimate days of worldwide warfare II, Stalin ordered the deportation of the whole Crimean Tatar inhabitants, approximately 200,000 humans. past reminiscence bargains the 1st ethnographic exploration of this occasion, in addition to the 50 yr flow for repatriation. the various Crimean Tatars have again in a technique that comprises squatting on vacant land and self-immolation. Uehling asks how they grew to become keen to die for his or her nationwide collectivity. She presents a fine-grained research of ways "memories," sentiments, and goals of a fatherland by no means noticeable got here to be shared. Uehling indicates the second-generation has a shockingly instrumental position to play. the best way childrens right and interfere in parental narratives, dissidents problem interrogators, and audio system borrow and exchange traces index this social point of reminiscence.

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Within the ultimate days of worldwide conflict II, Stalin ordered the deportation of the total Crimean Tatar inhabitants, approximately 200,000 humans. past reminiscence deals the 1st ethnographic exploration of this occasion, in addition to the 50 12 months circulate for repatriation. a few of the Crimean Tatars have again in a technique that consists of squatting on vacant land and self-immolation.

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Additional info for Beyond Memory: The Crimean Tatars' Deportation and Return (Anthropology, History and the Critical Imagination)

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If Islam unified the Tatars of Crimea, it also separated them from their Christian neighbors. Russia was careful in religious matters, believing civil and religious governance best kept separate. A special Muslim clergy was appointed to supervise religious affairs and Tatar education. But Islam still fostered antimony toward the Russians. At a time when self-identification was expressed in religious terms, rule by Christians was inherently problematic. According to Islamic doctrine, any locale ruled by non-Muslims was by definition dar al-harb or the “sphere of war,” a land ruled by infidels (Ruthven 1997: 12).

E. (Kudusov 1995: 15). 8 Instrumental in promoting this view were E. V. Veimarn and S. A. Sekerinski, candidates in history who allegedly succumbed to government and party directives, and wrote about a possible Slavic presence in Crimea as early as the third and fourth century (Sevdiar 1997: 5). Tatars take issue with this view, arguing that to establish this Russian perspective, scholars had to hide the real ethnogenesis of the Crimean Tatars and create the appearance of having found Russian archeological remains (Sevdiar 1997: 2).

While images and discourse surrounding the Orient provided an imaginative escape and a metaphor for the forbidden, the Balkans “with their unimaginative concreteness” inspired an attitude that eventually became pejorative (1997:14; also see Wolff 2001). While Crimea as a concrete place may never have lived up to its rich description in travelogues, it still belongs within a nested set of orientalisms as a source of positive and mysterious associations. What is remarkable here is not only the racialism and essentialism involved, but the collapse of chronology.

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Beyond Memory: The Crimean Tatars' Deportation and Return (Anthropology, History and the Critical Imagination) by G. Uehling


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